IoT Developer Survey – What are developers doing with IoT?

Ian Skerrett

For the last 3 years, we have been working to create an IoT open source community at Eclipse. Like most open source communities, our community members are developers and in this case who are building IoT solutions. One common question I get asked is ‘What are developers doing with IoT’. Unfortunately, my answer varies between ‘everything’ and ‘I don’t know’. Not a very helpful response.

To help answer the question ‘What are developers doing with IoT?’ we have launched the IoT Developer Survey. Our hope is to get a cross-section of developers working in IoT to provide input into their plans for IoT solutions, the technology they use and their perceptions of the industry players. The survey is 18 questions and should take 5-10 minutes to complete. As a thank you we will draw 3 names who will win $100 gift cards at your favorite electronics distributor so you can build…

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Here’s more evidence that sports is a goldmine for machine learning

Gigaom

If you really like sports and you’re really skilled at data analysis or machine learning, you might want to make that your profession.

On Thursday, private equity firm Vista announced it has acquired a natural-language processing startup called Automated Insights and will make it a subsidiary of STATS, a sports data company that Vista also owns. It’s just the latest example of how much money there is to be made when you combine sports, data and algorithms.

The most-popular story about Automated Insights is that its machine-learning algorithms are behind the Associated Press’s remarkably successful automated corporate-earnings stories, but there’s much more to the business than that. The company claims its algorithms have a place in all sorts of areas where users might want to interact with information in natural language — fitness apps, health care, business intelligence and, of course, sports.

In fact, someone from Automated Insights recently told me that fantasy sports is…

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Are You a Dish-Washing Robot?

Math with Bad Drawings

or, How to Avoid Thinking in Math Class #3
(See Also Parts 1, 2, and 4)

On Friday I realized—yet again—that my too-clever-for-their-own-good students were finding ways to answer questions without understanding the ideas.

Rather than reckon with the concept of slope, they were memorizing a complex rule:

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That’s all true, so far as it goes, but it’s as opaque and sinister as the tax code.

“Math is supposed to make sense!” I told them, and in my flailing to explain why, I found myself reaching for my favorite rhetorical tool: the overly-detailed analogy.

So, to see what math class is like for memorization-driven students, imagine that you’re a household robot.

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Number Smoothies

Math with Bad Drawings

or, How to Avoid Thinking in Math Class #2
(See Also Parts 1, 3, and 4)

This September, I gave my 7th-graders an elegant little problem about a 12-step staircase. You’re climbing from the bottom to the top, using combinations of single and double steps. The question is, how many ways can you do this?

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I was stunned when some of my students offered answers almost immediately. “145!” one screamed, as if he had just gotten bingo. “Am I right?”

“Whoa, that was fast!” I said. “Why 145?”

“12 times 12, plus 1!” he announced. “Am I right?”

“But…” I hesitated. “But why 12 times 12? Why plus 1? Are we just doing random computations that sound like fun?”

He listened to my questioning with the same patience you’d give a friend’s mediocre guitar solo. Then he launched right back into his chorus: “So,” he said…

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Ready to wear sensor hubs

Atmel | Bits & Pieces


Majeed Ahmad explores the latest sensor hub offerings for wearable devices.  


Atmel has beefed up its sensor hub offerings for wearable devices with SAM D20 Cortex M0+ microcontroller core to add more functionality and further lower the power bar for battery-operated devices. The SAM D20 MCUs offer ultra-low power through a patented power-saving technique called “Event System” that allows peripherals to communicate directly with each other without involving the CPU.

Atmel is part of the group of chipmakers that use low-power MCUs for sensor management as opposed to incorporating low-power core within the application processor. According to market research firm IHS Technology, Atmel is the leading sensor hub device supplier with 32 percent market share.

Sensor hubs are semiconductor devices that carry out sensor processing tasks — like sensor fusion and sensor calibration — through an array of software algorithms and subsequently transform sensor data into app-ready information for smartphones, tablets and…

View original post 611 more words

Ready to wear sensor hubs

Atmel | Bits & Pieces


Majeed Ahmad explores the latest sensor hub offerings for wearable devices.  


Atmel has beefed up its sensor hub offerings for wearable devices with SAM D20 Cortex M0+ microcontroller core to add more functionality and further lower the power bar for battery-operated devices. The SAM D20 MCUs offer ultra-low power through a patented power-saving technique called “Event System” that allows peripherals to communicate directly with each other without involving the CPU.

Atmel is part of the group of chipmakers that use low-power MCUs for sensor management as opposed to incorporating low-power core within the application processor. According to market research firm IHS Technology, Atmel is the leading sensor hub device supplier with 32 percent market share.

Sensor hubs are semiconductor devices that carry out sensor processing tasks — like sensor fusion and sensor calibration — through an array of software algorithms and subsequently transform sensor data into app-ready information for smartphones, tablets and…

View original post 611 more words