First steps with TensorFlow.js

Aral Roca

I would like to do more articles explaining a little bit about all the machine learning and deep learning basics. I’m a beginner in this area, but I’d like to explain soon these concepts to create some interesting AI models.

Nevertheless, we don’t need a deep knowledge about machine learning to use some existing models. We can use some libraries like Keras, Tensorflow or TensorFlow.js. We are going to see here how to create basic AI models and use more sophisticated models with TensorFlow.js.

Although it’s not required a deep knowledge, we are going to explain few concepts.

What is a Model?

Or maybe a better question would be: ‘What is the reality?’. Yes, that’s quite complex to answer… We need to simplify it in order to understand it!

A way to represent a part of this simplified “reality”  is using a model. So; there are infinity kind of models: world…

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In praise of SWARMing

Dan North & Associates

Most of my work these days is helping organisations figure out how to be more effective, in terms of how quickly they can identify and respond to the needs of their external and internal customers, and how well their response meets those needs. This tends to be easy enough in the small; the challenges appear as we try to scale these techniques to the hundreds, thousands or tens of thousands of people.

It is into this space that a new generation of software methods have emerged. SAFe, LeSS, DAD and others claim to help enterprises “scale agile,” whatever that means. A generous interpretation is that people who have a track record helping organisations on this journey have managed to codify their knowledge into a set of blueprints, guidelines, frameworks and methods so you don’t have to. Another take is that execs in organisations above a certain size like to buy…

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Welcome to the Center of the Universe

Longreads

Shannon Stirone | LongreadsMarch 2018 | 22 minutes (5,546 words)

The power has just gone out in mission control. I look to Jim McClure, operations manager at the Space Flight Operations Facility, and he assures me that everything is fine. A power outage like this hasn’t happened at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in nearly eight years, and while it’s only been out for a few seconds, the Deep Space Network is disconnected and NASA has temporarily lost contact with Cassini, the nearly 20-year-old space probe in orbit around Saturn, as well as all spacecraft beyond the moon.

We’re standing in JPL’s mission control, known simply as the Dark Room to those who work here. Five men and women are glued to their screens, the artificial pink-and-white glow highlighting their faces. I’ve been here twice before, but I have never seen this many people running the consoles. The operators…

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