A Look at Image Segmentation using CNNs

Mohit Jain

Image segmentation is the task in which we assign a label to pixels (all or some in the image) instead of just one label for the whole image. As a result, image segmentation is also categorized as a dense prediction task. Unlike detection using rectangular bounding boxes, segmentation provides pixel accurate locations of objects in an image. Therefore, image segmentation plays a very important role in medical analysis, object detection in satellite images, iris recognition, autonomous vehicles, and many more tasks.

With the advancements in deep learning methods, image segmentation has greatly improved in the last few years; in terms of both accuracy and speed. We can now generate segmentations of an image within a fraction of a second and still be very accurate and precise.

The Goal of this Post

Through this post, we’ll cover the intuition behind some of the main techniques and architectures used in image segmentation…

View original post 3,274 more words

Welcome to the Center of the Universe

Longreads

Shannon Stirone | LongreadsMarch 2018 | 22 minutes (5,546 words)

The power has just gone out in mission control. I look to Jim McClure, operations manager at the Space Flight Operations Facility, and he assures me that everything is fine. A power outage like this hasn’t happened at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in nearly eight years, and while it’s only been out for a few seconds, the Deep Space Network is disconnected and NASA has temporarily lost contact with Cassini, the nearly 20-year-old space probe in orbit around Saturn, as well as all spacecraft beyond the moon.

We’re standing in JPL’s mission control, known simply as the Dark Room to those who work here. Five men and women are glued to their screens, the artificial pink-and-white glow highlighting their faces. I’ve been here twice before, but I have never seen this many people running the consoles. The operators…

View original post 5,594 more words

Designing Windows 95’s User Interface

Socket 3

win95uidesignThree years ago I came across an interesting paper written up by a Microsoft employee, Kent Sullivan, on the process and findings of designing the new user interface for Windows 95. The web page has since been taken down – one reason why I’m a bit of a digital hoarder.

It specified some of the common issues experienced from Windows 3.1’s Program Manager shell and looked at the potential of developing a separate shell for ‘beginners’. Admittedly my inclination was that this was possibly inspired by Apple’s At Ease program that was reasonably popular during the System 7 days. I remember At Ease well during my primary school years, so kids couldn’t mess with the hard disk in Finder.

So here’s what Kent had to say verbatim in his paper titled “The Windows 95 User Interface: A Case Study in Usability Engineering” so it’s not lost altogether.

View original post 4,695 more words