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The 50 Startups That Launched At Y Combinator Summer 2015 Demo Day 1

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

Hardware took the spotlight at today’s Y Combinator Demo Day, reflecting a major shift of the accelerator beyond the cliche mobile app startup. Out of the 50 companies from the Summer 2015 batch that demoed on the record today, 20 featured hardware. What was formally the Demo Day lunchroom has become an expo hall for all manners of robots and gadgets.

Tomorrow, another 50 or so startups will present. Soon, we’ll have our selections made for our favorites. But for now, here’s a look at all 50 that strutted the stage today:

TeaBOT — An automated beverage vendor

TeaBOT is a robot that makes grab’n’go tea. You enter up to three types of its dozen teas, pay via iPad or credit card, and the bot automatically mixes you a hot cup of tea. The company says the bots can earn $100,000 a year. The startup licenses the TeaBOTs to retailers and colleges, and…

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The Mystery Money Creating The Unicorn Herd

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

[tc_contributor_byline slug=”jeff-grabow”]

Varied explanations for the growing herd of unicorns — and predictions of their imminent demise — abound. But all can agree: Those who invest in unicorns are chasing returns they can’t get elsewhere. And while venture capital is widely perceived to be fueling the unicorns’ growth, a closer look reveals that not all venture capital is really venture capital.

Data on VC fundraising shows a long-term decline in capital to VC funds, a trend I covered here. If less money goes in, less is available to be deployed.

image009 Declining fundraising in the U.S. since 2007. 2009 marks the fewest funds raised in 16 years. 2009 was the low point in terms of dollars raised since 2003.

In 2014, Dow Jones reported that the amount of venture capital invested in the United States soared to $52 billion, from $35 billion in 2013, an increase of almost 50 percent…

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How Amazon Could Drive Blended Reality Into The Living Room

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

[tc_dropcap]A[/tc_dropcap]mazon has been amassing computer vision expertise for a long time. And continues to do so. A LinkedIn search for computer vision jobs at the company currently returns more than 50 posts — mostly split across research and software engineering roles. But is there more than meets the eye to the ecommerce giant’s interest in technologies that can sense the world around them?

Amazon’s nascent drone delivery program, Prime Air, is one clear driver to hire scientists with a grounding in machine learning and computer vision, since drones need to navigate in real world environments. And if you’re chasing a dream of autonomous delivery drones, as Amazon is, then accurate object detection and dynamic collision avoidance are essential.

Likewise there’s Amazon’s thus far ill-fated foray into smartphones, with last year’s debut Fire Phone. The handset’s flagship feature was a 3D interface that uses data from four front-facing cameras to generate three dimensional effects on screen…

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Originally posted on howtosurvivecomputerscienceincollege:

Java is an object orientated programming language (so is c++ and python) which means that the programming is centered around using classes and methods to create objects, and then using those objects in your code. I will take two posts to explain objects, the first will be how to create objects, and the second will be to show all of the different functionality that objects have.

An object is something that has different states and behaviors for example a bear has states such as color, type, ..ect and a bear has behaviors such as growling, eating, sleeping. You create an object by creating an instance of the class that the object is defined in.

public class Bear {

private String color;

public Bear(int age, String type) {

this.age = age;

this.type = type;


void growling() {  }

void eating() {  }

void sleeping() {   }


so this…

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Meet the French startup set to revolutionize the Internet of things

Originally posted on Fortune:

This fall a new kind of wireless network will launch in a metropolis near you. This network won’t connect to phones or tablets. Instead it will provide the wireless links necessary to connect devices, appliances and sensors that make up the Internet of things (IoT).

The company building the network is called Sigfox, and it’s based in Europe (Toulouse, France, to be exact) where it’s already set up networks in France, Spain, the U.K., and five other countries. Sigfox-powered sensors are being slapped on fire hydrants (to monitor water pressure), embedded in home alarms (to alert the authorities when they’re tripped), and even buried in the dirt (to monitor the soil density of farmland). This year, however, it’s moving to its largest country to date, the U.S., where it plans to build networks covering the ten largest cities.

Wireless connectivity that covers a wide swath of land is nothing…

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How Shazam Works

Originally posted on Free Won't:

There is a cool service called Shazam, which take a short sample of music, and identifies the song.  There are couple ways to use it, but one of the more convenient is to install their free app onto an iPhone.  Just hit the “tag now” button, hold the phone’s mic up to a speaker, and it will usually identify the song and provide artist information, as well as a link to purchase the album.

What is so remarkable about the service, is that it works on very obscure songs and will do so even with extraneous background noise.  I’ve gotten it to work sitting down in a crowded coffee shop and pizzeria.

So I was curious how it worked, and luckily there is a paper written by one of the developers explaining just that.  Of course they leave out some of the details, but the basic idea is…

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More Startup Funding Is Available, But Who’s Getting It?

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

[tc_contributor_byline slug=”larry-alton”]

Last year was fantastic for startup fundraising, continuing an upward trend with a dramatic increase to more than $47 billion (a 62 percent increase from 2013’s figures). On the surface, this is great news — more venture capitalists are pouring more money into startups, thereby increasing the amount of available resources for new ideas.

But the type of companies receiving this funding, and the way this funding is distributed, illustrate a system that prefers certain industries and certain types of ideas over others. Popular consumer apps get all the attention, but the number of these ideas that actually get investments is relatively low. The elite app ideas will always get tremendous financial backing, but other, less-flashy industries with more environmental conditions that favor success are starting to emerge as worthy entrepreneurial ventures.

How Is The Money Distributed?

The trends dictating this increase in total available funding are actually…

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